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Thursday, December 8, 2011

Size Confusion

Why size doesn't matter: The perspective bending photos that turn everyday holiday snaps into mind-boggling works of art



You would be forgiven for mistaking these photographs for something out of Gulliver's Travels or Alice in the Wonderland.

The clever examples of forced perspective photography produce mind-boggling results from around the globe.
With the creative camera work, the photographers have been able to pull the wool over the eyes of human perception even making a little girl appear to stand over the Eiffel Tower.

Hanging around: A giant tourist holds a woman over water at the Perito Moreno glacier in the Argentine region of Patagonia with just one hand
Among the stunning shots complied by environmentalgraffiti.com is a playful holiday snap which shows a giant tourist holding a woman over water at the Perito Moreno glacier in the Argentine region of Patagonia with just one hand.
Another visual gag shows a man about to eat a space shuttle at the Kennedy Space Centre at Cape Canaveral, Florida.


Standing tall: This little girl towers over the world famous Eiffel Tower while a woman touches the top of a lighthouse at Nova Scotia's Peggy's Cove


Size matters: The world's largest salt plains of Salar de Uyuni in Bolivia provides the perfect setting for photographers keen to test out their perspective-bending skills
Nova Scotia's Peggy's Cove is the backdrop for another on the list, with a woman appearing to tower over its classic red-and-white lighthouse.
Salar de Uyuni in Bolivia provides the perfect setting for photographers keen to test out their perspective-bending skills, two examples manipulating the perception of size in this collection have been taken in the region, one with a giant banana large enough for two people to sit on.


Take-off:  The Kennedy Space Center at Cape Canaveral, Florida is the launch pad for both of these visual gags
The vast, expansive landscapes of the world's largest salt plains have few features to shatter the illusion of big objects appearing small or small objects big, says writer Karl Fabricius who compiled the pictures.

Full of hot air: This example shows a woman blowing out the steam from the Old Faithful, Yellowstone's most famous geyser

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