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Friday, November 9, 2012

Beautiful Poppy Fields

Just in time for Remembrance Day. . . the most beautiful photographs of poppy fields you'll ever see

By Daily Mail Reporter 
This spectacular display of blood-red poppy fields was photographed in a moving tribute to soldiers as Britain prepares to remember its fallen heroes this weekend.
The amazing shots were taken by Alan Ranger, 43, at Blackstone Farm nature reserve in Bewdley, Worcestershire, during a one-week window when the poppies appear in full bloom.
Mr Ranger has released the photographs of the poppies - whose seeds can lie dormant in soil for more than 80 years before germinating - in time for Remembrance Sunday on November 11.
Beautiful: Mr Ranger said he is 'always amazed by nature's beauty' and appreciative of what is around him
Beautiful: Mr Ranger said he is 'always amazed by nature's beauty' and appreciative of what is around him
Sweeping view: The amazing shots were taken by Alan Ranger, 43, at Blackstone Farm nature reserve in Bewdley, Worcestershire, during a one-week window when the poppies appear in full bloom
Sweeping view: The amazing shots were taken by Alan Ranger, 43, at Blackstone Farm nature reserve in Bewdley, Worcestershire, during a one-week window when the poppies appear in full bloom
Tribute: Mr Ranger has released the photographs of the poppies - whose seeds can lie dormant in soil for more than 80 years before germinating - in time for Remembrance Sunday this weekend
Tribute: Mr Ranger has released the photographs of the poppies - whose seeds can lie dormant in soil for more than 80 years before germinating - in time for Remembrance Sunday this weekend
Sea of colour: This spectacular display of blood-red poppy fields was photographed as a moving tribute
Sea of colour: This spectacular display of blood-red poppy fields was photographed as a moving tribute
Mr Ranger said: 'There's only a small window to take the pictures because they are only in bloom for one week during the year, and they never last very long.
'There was a lot of planning and research involved in getting the perfect shots.
'The first week I went, they weren't ready - and then I had to wait three or four days for it to stop raining and I wasn't sure if the downpour would have flattened the poppies.
'I went to the field at 3.30am in the morning and spent four hours taking pictures before sunrise and then returned in the evening to take pictures before sunset.
'That's the ideal time to take the pictures as the sun is a lot lower in the sky and it gives a softer light. It brings out the colour and contrast in a more harmonious way.
Quick shot: Mr Ranger said there was 'only a small window' to take the photos because they are in bloom for one week of the year
Quick shot: Mr Ranger said there was 'only a small window' to take the photos because they are in bloom for one week of the year
Ready to bloom: The petals of one flower will soon break through the bud
In bloom: One flower proudly stands to attention among the others
Ready to bloom: The petals of one poppy prepare to break through the bud, while in another image one flower rises above a number of others
Early start: Mr Ranger went to the field at 3.30am and spent four hours taking pictures before sunrise
Early start: Mr Ranger went to the field at 3.30am and spent four hours taking pictures before sunrise
Up close: One of Alan Ranger's pictures of the poppies
Photographer: Alan Ranger took the beautiful pictures at Blackstone Farm nature reserve
Up close: A shot of the flowers shown taken from nearby shows the details of the flowers. All the images pictured here were taken by Alan Ranger, who photographed them over the course of a week when they are in full bloom
First World War battlefields were often churned into mud and covered with fallen soldiers, before they became covered by poppies. They have since been used as a symbol of remembrance.
On this nature reserve they are also a symbol of hope, as Worcestershire Wildlife Trust encourages native plants and wildlife to return to the fields - without the use of fertilisers and herbicides.
Mr Ranger added: 'I knew at the time I'd taken a good picture. I looked at the back of the camera and saw it was a really good shot.
'I'm always amazed by nature's beauty and I'm appreciative of what's around me. I really enjoyed the moment, I was marvelling at the spectacle of colour.
'The poppy is a symbol of Remembrance Day, so I wanted to release a collection of photographs as a mark of respect.'

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