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Tuesday, December 31, 2013

Artistic Google Street Views

Italian artist turns Google Street View glitches into masterpieces

Most people use Google Street View to get around, scout a neighborhood or pretend they are on vacation, but one artist had another idea.
Emilio Vavarella, from Italy, has taken technical glitches found on the ubiquitous service and made them into something greater.
'Report A Problem' is a showcase of some of the more unusual Street View glitches found by Mr Vavarella.
Other projects have attempted to illustrate how to view local nature on the site, or to see flash mobs - but nothing has been done with the glitches until now.
The project is made up of 100 such images, which Mr Vavarella made a selection of available to MailOnline.
Melded together: One building appears to melt into another in this picture
Melded together: One building appears to melt into another in this picture
We have a problem: This picture shows where a camera had a technical difficulty
We have a problem: This picture shows where a camera had a technical difficulty
Vortex: This haunting image appears to show a vortex through which another world is visible
Vortex: This haunting image appears to show a vortex through which another world is visible

Fountain Bridge In Seoul

Banpo bridge has become main tourist attraction. With his nearly 10 thousand nozzles on either side of the bridge that shoots out 190 tons of water every minute he turns yourself from ordinary to an amazing and unique bridge. Fountain bridge would help acknowledge Seoul as an eco-friendly destination amassing more tourist says the Seoul mayor.






5 Crazy Places We Can Go Looking for Diamonds


 
5 Crazy Places We Can Go Looking for Diamonds
Hold on to your engagement rings. Diamonds, according to an industry report, are falling off a supply cliff in 2018. As existing diamond mines are depleted even as worldwide demand increases—thanks, especially to a newly rich Asia—three months' salary might soon buy you a much punier rock.
But look at the big picture: A diamond, after all, is just carbon arranged in a pretty crystal, and carbon is the fourth most abundant element in the universe. May we suggest a few other places to look for diamonds in this universe?

Under the ice in Antarctica

5 Crazy Places We Can Go Looking for DiamondsSEXPAND
Named after the South African town Kimberly that inspired a 19th century diamond rush, kimberlite is a type of rock famous for containing diamonds. It initially forms deep in the earth, where the high heat and extraordinary pressure are also perfect for forming diamonds. Geologists recently reported vast kimberlite deposits in Antarctica's Prince Charles Mountains. They haven't dug up any diamonds yet, but it's very likely the gems are there, given the kimberlite.
Aside from ice over two miles thick and freezing temperatures, though, the prospective Antarctica diamonds are also protected by 1991 accord that prohibits mining on the continent. On second thought, maybe just head to the warmer temperatures of Siberia, instead.

In an once-secret crater in Siberia

Last year, the Russians revealed the existence of a 35-million-year-old, 62-mile wide crater full of diamonds in eastern Siberia. The crash that carved out the the crater, known as the Popigai Astroblem, had also released enough energy to turn some of the graphite into superhard diamonds. Because these "impact diamonds" were formed by a different process than most, Popigai's diamonds are especially superhard and most suitable for industrial uses. According to the director of the Novosibirsk Institute of Geology and Mineralogy, the deposit of superhard diamonds is bigger than all of the world's known reserves by a factor of ten. Now they just have to mine them.
The massive diamond field was first discovered in the 1970s, apparently, but the Soviets kept it secret because they were already busy with Mirny, the largest diamond mine in the world.

On Saturn and Jupiter, where it could be raining diamonds


It's a matter of chemistry. Lightning tears apart methane molecules, releasing carbon as soot. As the soot floats down, heat and pressure in the atmosphere increases, compressing the soot first into graphite and then into diamonds. When those diamonds finally reach the planets' core, it's so hot they melt. The whole process probably takes a thousand years. Any place where diamonds are actively forming and melting is really no place for carbon-based lifeforms like us. But what a sight to imagine.Diamonds in the sky? How about diamonds raining down from alien atmospheres. According to calculations by two planetary scientists, the volatile high-pressure skies of Jupiter and Saturn are just right for creating diamond rain.

On a planet made of solid diamond

First, astronomers discovered a planet with land masses made of diamond; then they found an entire planet made of diamond. The Jupiter-sized planet is mostly carbon and so dense—denser than any other known planet—that scientists think the carbon must have become diamond. It's 20 times as dense as Jupiter. It is, however, 4,ooo light years away.

In a lab

5 Crazy Places We Can Go Looking for Diamonds
Synthetic diamonds under a scanning electron microcscope. Ludvig14/Wikimedia Commons
Okay, we're coming back down to earth for this one. While the phrase diamonds are a girl's best friend is an example of stunningly successful mass marketing bullshit, the gem does have special properties that make it especially useful for cutting and as an electrical insulator. 90% of industrial-grade diamonds are actually synthetic. Synthetic diamonds are easier to get in large quantities, and their properties can be tailored to a specific use.
When it comes to jewelry, the human eye can't tell the difference between mined and synthetic diamonds, either. Of course, this greatly concerns the diamond industry, and De Beers has developed machines to distinguish between the two. While synthetic diamonds have been around for decades, only 2% of them end up in jewelry.
A lab, I suppose, doesn't sound too romantic. Then again, neither does a mine. As long as it's economically viable—as long as we keep suffering from the delusion that carbon crystals representing love must be unearthed from the ground—we'll deep digging massive holes in the earth.
But perhaps specially grown and utterly unique synthetic diamonds, custom-made for your loved one in a lab specifically designed for the purpose, could take on their own meaning. You can even turn ashes from cremation into a synthetic diamond. The carbon cycle is not without its own poetry.
Diamond photo via 123dartist/Shutterstock. Antarctica photo via Volodymyr Goinyk/Shutterstock

Monday, December 30, 2013

Life In Graveyard.

How would it be like living amongst the dead? How would it be like having the graveyard converted to a home? This is exactly the case with almost 10000 families in Philippines. It would be interesting to hear about this fact that there are close to 10000 families of Filipino origin living in cemetery in the northern town in Manila. One would be obliged to call them funny people, but it could be like an accident that they made it their home. It is also quite interesting to see people living in mausoleums and the best places to see this would be Manila and no other city.

Young And Stupid.

When you're young you are desirous to investigate the environment, to play around and to learn something every day. But, no one is born with life experience and everyone has to learn from his mistakes, even this animal which was born with natural built-in instincts.

This young leopard has discovered in a hard way how it feels when you try to mess around with a porcupine.  Sooner or later he will learn that it is better for him to find something more tasty than this bunch of needles for a lunch.







Guinness World Records records - Vegetables category

Guinness World Records records -vegetables category




Friday, December 27, 2013

Cute Animal Pictures

Tis the season to be FURRY: We present the cutest animal pictures you will see all Christmas

  • Collection of pictures shows a variety of animals braving the wintery weather to venture out into the cold
  • One indulgent squirrel greedily tucks into a mince pie while another eyes up a Christmas jumper
  • Hazel the search dog receives gifts in Afghanistan while Kali the polar bear orphan slides around in make-shift sled

This festive collection ofimages proves it's not just humans who enjoy tucking in to one too many mince pies, wearing garish festive attire and playing around in the snow.
Because as the storms continue to rage outside, these hardy creatures have well and truly embraced the winter weather and are lapping-up all the best elements of Christmas.
One squirrel who's clearly not watching his weight greedily gobbles down a mince pie, while another, more health conscious creature, daintily reaches out for some berries.
Meanwhile, one very over-excited dog is clearly loving his Father Christmas hat - bounding down the hallways of the Battersea Dogs Home with an excited look on its face, while another squirrel looks longingly at a royal blue festive jumper.
Elsewhere, a selection of birds do some last minute food shopping - picking up some festive essentials and taking them back to their nests.
And then there's the Kali polar bear, who looks blissfully happy playing around in the snow and Hazel, the search dog in Afghanistan who's thrilled at her gifts.
Treating yourself, are we? One peckish squirrel in Glasgow looks lovingly at a mince pie that he holds  greedily between his paws
Treating yourself, are we? One peckish squirrel in Glasgow looks lovingly at a mince pie that he holds greedily between his paws
Go on, it's Christmas! The hungry animal manages to fit almost all of the pie into his mouth as it takes in the view across Kelvingrove Park, Scotland
Go on, it's Christmas! The hungry animal manages to fit almost all of the pie into his mouth as it takes in the view across Kelvingrove Park, Scotland
Gwyneth would be proud: This Canadian squirrel seems to be practising its yoga skills - ala Gyneth Paltrow - as it reaches out for some healthy berries
Gwyneth would be proud: This Canadian squirrel seems to be practising its yoga skills - ala Gyneth Paltrow - as it reaches out for some healthy berries

Stunning Space Images Of 2013

From Saturn's hexagonal storm to the penguin-shaped nebula: MailOnline showcases the most stunning space images of 2013

  • 2013 was the year of the Twitpic with ISS astronauts sharing hundreds of incredible images of Earth from space
  • Amateurs gave space agencies a run for their money with close-up images of the sun taken from their back garden
  • Meanwhile, billion pound telescopes explored the darker reaches of our galaxy revealing some unexpected shapes

From Mars' 'Grand Canyon' to a penguin-shaped nebula, this year's breath-taking space photography has taken us on an incredible journey through the mysterious depths of our galaxy.
But it wasn't just cutting-edge space telescopes that provided stunning images - amateur photographers and astronauts have also helped reveal previously unseen views of our universe.
Leading the way was former commander of the International Space Station (ISS) Chris Hadfield who, throughout the year, shared intimate details of his life in space with his army of Twitter followers.  
This captivating image of the Orion nebula reveals an area of our galaxy as a bustling neighbourhood of recently formed stars, hot gas and dark dust. The nebula is visible to the unaided eye as a small fuzzy patch in the constellation of Orion
This captivating image of the Orion nebula reveals an area of our galaxy as a bustling neighbourhood of recently formed stars, hot gas and dark dust. The nebula is visible to the unaided eye as a small fuzzy patch in the constellation of Orion
One of his most impressive photos was an shot of San Francisco's Golden Gate Bridge taken from his lofty perch on the ISS 200 miles above Earth.
As well as San Francisco's landmark, Hadfield - who has described the shifting view of the earth from windows of the space station as 'a perpetual magnet' - snapped the bright lights of Manhattan at night, the 'endless' golden beaches of Australia and 'cauliflower' clouds sitting over the Amazon.

More...
In an exclusive interview with the MailOnline earlier this month, the Canadian astronaut revealed that he took over 40,000 photos during his five month stint on the spaceship, with unseen photography expected to be released by Nasa next year.
Up until this year, images taken of Saturn's hexagonal storm have been in infrared wavelengths, showing false-colour shades   of red, orange and green. In October, Cassini, which has been orbiting the planet for over nine years, captured the northern hexagon in its true, incredible colours
Up until this year, images taken of Saturn's hexagonal storm have been in infrared wavelengths, showing false-colour shades of red, orange and green. In October, Cassini, which has been orbiting the planet for over nine years, captured the northern hexagon in its true, incredible colours
Mark Gee's image of the Milky Way came first in the Earth and Space Category in the Astronomy Photographer of the Year awards. The shot shows central regions of the Milky Way Galaxy - over 26,000 light years away - appearing as a tangle of dust and stars, lit up by a lighthouse on the Cape Palliser, New Zealand, shining out to sea
Mark Gee's image of the Milky Way came first in the Earth and Space Category in the Astronomy Photographer of the Year awards. The shot shows central regions of the Milky Way Galaxy - over 26,000 light years away - appearing as a tangle of dust and stars, lit up by a lighthouse on the Cape Palliser, New Zealand, shining out to sea

Two Year Old Shepherd

Britain's littlest shepherd, aged two, a lamb called Twinkle - and a bond between boy and sheep that will melt your heart
  • Arthur Jones, two, looks after his own six-strong herd on Dorset farm
  • Arthur, who has cerebral palsy, walks thanks to his sheep Twinkle
  • He is Britain's youngest shepherd and has won several prizes

Boxing Day morning is traditionally a time for long sleeps and leisurely breakfasts. But while most of Britain takes it easy after yesterday's festivities, little Arthur Jones will be out in the Dorset countryside mending fences.
Many winter mornings have seen him out in the fields, hammering tacks into a post, wearing his favourite tweed cap.
He also feeds the sheep, rattling a tiny pail containing a handful of pellets. 'Come on Twinkle!' he calls to a ewe with a dense white fleece and a calm demeanour, who dutifully trots across to him.
Cuteness overload: Arthur Jones, two-and-a-half, with his lamb Twinkle and his miniature crook
Cuteness overload: Arthur Jones, two-and-a-half, with his lamb Twinkle and his miniature crook
So far, so ordinary for a hard-working farmhand. But Arthur is just two years old. As Britain's youngest shepherd, he has been herding and caring for his own little flock of six pedigree sheep for almost a year now, under the tutelage of his grandma Nicky Jesse, one of the country's few shepherdesses. She'll be out there with him today, taking the lead as  they mend the fences.
Arthur is a bit of a celebrity in shepherding circles. He is the youngest ever member of the Poll Dorset and Dorset Horn Sheep Breeders' Association, has won three prizes in county shows and has even been introduced to the Countess of Wessex.
His mum Sarah — Nicky's daughter — has many reasons to be proud of him; not least because he was born two-and-a-half months prematurely and has cerebral palsy.
His lower body has been affected by the condition: doctors warned that he would not walk until he was four.
But Arthur had other plans: this September he took his first steps unaided, and Nicky is certain his exceptional progress can be attributed to the extraordinary bond between him and Twinkle.
Little shepherd: The   tiny farmboy feeds on of the lambs at his grandmother's
Little shepherd: The tiny farmboy feeds on of the lambs at his grandmother's
Winning: Arthur Jones with his grandmother Nicky Jesse (and Twinkle) being awarded highly commended at the New Forest Show
Winning: Arthur Jones with his grandmother Nicky Jesse (and Twinkle) being awarded highly commended at the New Forest Show

Thursday, December 26, 2013

Cork havest

Harvest for the Patient Farmer


http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-0-RFQhAaQIk/Un5ogZtWVTI/AAAAAAAArmc/93TchkuZIkA/s1600/cork+harvest+oak+15.jpg

 
http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-lKqHfOVw4gU/Un5zXJiQt0I/AAAAAAAArno/rdrYu_0Etc0/s320/wine+corks.jpg

 
Have you ever wondered where that cork in your bottle of wine comes from? The answer is most likely to be Spain or Portugal, where over half of the world's cork is harvested - it is in fact the National Tree of the latter country.

However, unlike other forms of forestry, the production of cork never involves the death of a tree.
Instead, they are gently stripped, leaving a strange but fascinating landscape of denuded trunks.
http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-YuayQUqKjjM/Un5hW4yte8I/AAAAAAAArk8/9nVaQuBPCdg/s640/cork+harvest+oak+5.jpg

 

Risky...Very Risky....

During a dangerous circus show in China a Siberian Tiger almost caught an acrobat






Strange And Wonderful Inventions From The Past

A collection of weird and wonderful inventions from the past that range from useful to absolutely insane. Many of these inventions seem to solve problems and cover needs that we have now bypassed through advancements in technology, others are just straight up crazy!

1. Ice Cube Mask Designed To Cure Hangovers (1947)

2. Baby Stroller Protected From Gas Attacks (1938)

3. Single Wheel Motorcycle (1931)

Wednesday, December 25, 2013

Liquid Sculptures

The mesmerising 'liquid sculptures' took endless patience, hundreds of camera clicks and SIX MONTHS to create

  • Tapan Sheth, a photographer from India, took six months to create these dream-like 'liquid sculptures'
  • Images created by letting drop fall into coloured liquid then very quickly pressing the camera shutter
It may have taken six months, hundred of pictures and endless patience, but the efforts of Indian photographer Tapan Sheth have all been worth it after he managed to capture these stunning images of 'water sculptures'.
Sheth, from Rajkot, in Gujarat, added coloured dye to liquid along with guar gum, a food thickener similar to cornflour, then set up his camera equipment.
The 34-year-old  got these mesmerising images by letting a drop fall into the rest of the liquid, then quickly pressing the camera shutter.
Tapan Sheth, 34, from India, took six months to create these mesmerising images by letting coloured droplets fall into liquid
Tapan Sheth, 34, from India, took six months to create these mesmerising images by letting coloured droplets fall into liquid
To create the magical effects Sheth added coloured dyes and guar gum, a thickener similar to cornfour, to water before letting the drop fall
To create the magical effects Sheth added coloured dyes and guar gum, a thickener similar to cornfour, to water before letting the drop fall
While the colours may be added, the shape of the droplets are completely real

Year end collection of exotic scenic places of our world

SOME UNIQUE PLACES FROM AROUND THE WORLD

The Butchart Gardens in Brentwood Bay, British Columbia, Canada
alt

The bridge that connects Asia to Europe at Istanbul, Turkey
alt

The Blue Dragon River in Portugal
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Fine Art By Diego Ravalico.

Triest #2

Triest #3

Triest #4

The Deepest Step Well In The World.

Chand Baori is a famous stepwell situated in the village Abhaneri near Jaipur in Indian state of Rajasthan. This step well is located opposite Harshat Mata Temple and is one of the deepest and largest step wells in India. It was built in 9th century and has 3500 narrow steps and 13 stories and is 100 feet deep. It is a fine example of the architectural excellence prevalent in the past.






Giant Shire Horses

Back to basics: Giant Shire horses used to tackle overgrown woodland in New Forest because it's too difficult for a machine to do

  • Horses weigh one ton and are capable of shifting timber the same weight as a double-decker bus in just one day
  • Locals are using the horse logging techniques to reduce the high level of untreated woodland in the national park

Visitors to the New Forest might be forgiven for doing a double-take when they see what 'machines' are being used to work the land these days.
Weighing one ton and capable of shifting timber the same weight as a double-decker bus in just one day, these Shire horses are being used to their full capacity in order to tackle overgrown woodland.
They have been employed to work in areas that are deemed too dense and boggy for modern, heavy machinery.
These mighty Shire horses are being used to tackle overgrown woodland in the New Forest,  Hampshire, in areas too dense and boggy for heavy machinery
These mighty Shire horses are being used to tackle overgrown woodland in the New Forest, Hampshire, in areas too dense and boggy for heavy machinery
The Percheron horses  can shift eight to ten tonnes of timber - the equivalent to the weight of a double-decker bus - in just one day
The Percheron horses can shift eight to ten tonnes of timber - the equivalent to the weight of a double-decker bus - in just one day
Locals are using the traditional horse logging techniques to reduce the high level of untreated woodland in the national park.
They are being trained to manage the Percheron horses to clear timber from wooded sites, which make up more than 40 per cent of the park.
The people have been shown how to load logs and woodland on to wheeled carts, which are connected to a harness and attached to the horse.
If the woodland is left alone, the quality of the habitat will decline, pests and disease could spread and this could result in fewer wildlife species living in the area.
The horses - which can tow eight to ten tonnes a day - are used in areas that cannot be reached by modern machinery.
As well as being able to access the areas, horses also have the advantage of not causing damage to the ground.
In addition, footpaths do not have to be closed around the areas, and there is less noise pollution.
Locals are using the traditional  horse logging techniques to reduce the high level of untreated woodland in the national park
Locals are using the traditional horse logging techniques to reduce the high level of untreated woodland in the national park

Note :

Most of the contents are published here were collected through email and Internet. I bear no responsibility for these contents.